Ask the Expert

Advice on moving from networking into Web development

I am an MCSE, NT4.0 and W2K, and I would like to move into Web development in the near future. At first, I started learning Java, which was going fine, but now I have decided to learn SQL admin, then SQL database implementation and design. My thought is that from here I can then do my Java, as well as another, possibly C#.

It is hard to know if I am making the right choices, but I know that at 40 my time is numbered in Microsoft support. So if development works for me, then perhaps it will give me longevity in this industry.

Any advice would be great and most appreciated.

    Requires Free Membership to View

It sounds like you're weighing some interesting options for career growth. According to industry surveys and reports, either Java/C# or SQL Server offer good growth and longevity opportunities, no matter which way you go. FWIW, development work is more taxing on the brain, means more time spent working alone, and requires the kind of mindset that revels in mastering arcane details and poring over the same lines of code until you get things right. As a former developer myself, I can appreciate the appeal of this kind of work. As long as you feel well-suited for that kind of work and work environment, you should be pretty well taken care of for your working career. One of my colleagues and co-workers is in his early 60s -- he's a Java and database expert himself -- and claims he plans to keep working until he's 75. (I'm talking about Dr. Bill Brogden, author of the Java 2 Programmer Exam Cram and numerous other Java titles.) If he can do it, I see no reason why you can't do it, too.

Good luck!

--Ed--

This was first published in July 2002

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: