Q

How do I log on as administrator?

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I am new to Windows XP and don't have much experience with Win2000. On a PC with a new 40 gig hard drive, I first formated 4 Gig as NTFS and loaded new XP Professional operating system. That went AOK. Now I want to format the rest of the 35 Gig as FAT32 Format, so others can copy files back and forth between machines. Every option to format gives me only the choice of NTFS format.

I also do not know how to successfully logon as administrator. One of the five logons displays administrator rights, but no password is required to logon as that person, so I don't think it's a true "Administrator." How do I log on as administrator? I think the password was set for the administrator when the XP was loaded. How do I format the remainder of the 40 Gig drive (approx 35 Gig) as FAT32 format, in two logical drives? I have NT 4.0 MCP in Workstation and Server.


If you're formatting a drive in XP with the Format command in Explorer, you're presented with NTFS by default. NTFS is a lot stabler and more secure than FAT32 -- it has better error-correction and recovers from problems more reliably. For that reason NTFS is generally preferred as the file system for new drives.

If you're formatting the drive as FAT32 for backwards compatibility, that's a good reason, though. However, if you're networking out the drive, it doesn't need to be any particular filesystem: both FAT32 and NTFS drives can be read across the network.

If you really want to force a drive to format as FAT32, you can do this through the command line: Type FORMAT [drive] /FS:FAT32 to force formatting a drive in FAT32. To set up logical drives, right-click on My Computer, select Manage, and go to the Disk Management tool, in which you can add, remove, or manipulate partitions and logical drives.

The default user set up in WinXP is always set up as an administrator, and unless a password was explicitly set during setup, there won't be one. If you go into Control Panel | User Accounts, you should be able to see the entire list of accounts and their respective permissions.


This was first published in February 2002

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