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I want to connect my server to the Internet though a router. How come I can ping my router, but can'

I have a linksys cable router and a Windows 2000 server. I want to connect my server to the Internet through the router. Sounds simple enough.

My server is running DHCP and DNS.
My

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server IP is 192.168.1.3

My router is not running DHCP.
My router IP is 192.168.1.1

I can ping the router but I get nothing from the Internet.

Any advice?
You've taken the first step in the troubleshooting process, and eliminated the possibility that LAN communications are causing the problem. Here are additional steps to take:

1) Determine if DNS resolution is the cause of the problem. From your server, open a command prompt. Issue an NSLOOKUP for any valid Internet address, and verify that you get the appropriate response. For example, type the command: "NSLOOKUP SEARCHWIN2000.COM". After you hit enter, NSLOOKUP should respond with a valid IP address (for me, it's 64.89.36.39). If you get the error "Non-existent domain", good news--you've identified the problem as DNS. Adjust your server's DNS settings so that queries are sent to a public DNS server--you may have to ask your ISP.

2) Determine if routing is the cause of the problem. From the command prompt on your server, issue the command "IPCONFIG". One of the lines should say "Default Gateway". The IP address configured should be 192.168.1.1. There should be no other default gateways configured. If this isn't the case, you've identified the problem as being the local routing configuration. Change your server's IP configuration so that the default gateway is 192.168.1.1.

If you still can't reach the Internet from your server, the problem is that the router is not forwarding packets. Adjusting the router configuration is harder to talk you through, because it varies so much from person to person. However, you should verify that your router has a valid public IP address, and a valid default gateway. Your ISP probably assigns your public IP address using DHCP. If this is the case, try renewing the DHCP lease. Good luck, and let us know how it turns out.

This was first published in November 2001

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