Premium Content

searchWindowsServer E-Handbooks

Featured E-Handbooks

  • System Center helps IT manage all that managing

    Microsoft's System Center 2012 R2 continues the tradition of managing multiple platforms from a suite of products. This handbook looks at the issues surrounding its use.

    Download Now

  • Windows Server 2012 migration station

    Windows Server has traditionally formed the cornerstone of the IT infrastructure in many organizations, and, for a majority of those companies, that will remain true. Enhancements in areas such as automation and scalability, however, make Windows Server 2012 much more of a cloud tool.

    This handbook provides details about what's changed in Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2. It also includes guidance on how best to bring Windows Server 2012's enhanced capabilities into a data center with as little disruption as possible.

    Download Now

Other E-Handbooks available for free to our members

    • Page 1 of 1
      • Identity management in the era of cloud and mobility

        Managing identity and access in the cloud represents a difficult challenge for IT administrators. Proper identity management contributes to a secure IT operation and is an element for a number of compliance regulations. For those and other reasons, an organization’s ability to control who accesses particular areas of an IT environment is important. Many IT organizations, however, aren’t succeeding; one Gartner report suggests almost half of businesses take the wrong approach to identity management. The cloud and the prevalence of mobile devices only adds layers of complexity to the problem. This handbook looks at tools and best practices that can help ensure an organization is properly handling identity management in the cloud. It will include discussion of tools and methods to manage authentication, how to work with cloud providers, and how Active Directory can and cannot help.

        View E-Handbook
      • Evaluating hardware for Windows Server 2008 R2

        You might think selecting the right system to run Windows Server 2008 R2 would focus largely on price/performance factors. While these factors are high on the list, there are other key considerations. In this handbook, we explore hardware considerations for Windows Server 2008 R2, including processing power, memory, storage capacity and built-in networking connectivity and management hooks needed to properly run an application workload and a specific version of Windows Server. We also evaluate maintenance contracts and which one best suits your business needs, which hardware add-ons are worthy to bundle with the system and which built-in software you need to more easily deploy the hardware in production environments. We also review hardware requirements to get ready for Microsoft’s next-generation operating system.

        View E-Handbook
      • Ten reasons to upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2

        It's always difficult to make a change in your server operating system, especially if your current solution mostly meets your needs. But organizations running older versions of Windows Server should take a hard look at upgrading to 2008 R2, which offers a number of new features that can serve to increase productivity and lower the total cost of ownership (TCO). In this handbook we explore the enhanced capabilities of Windows Server 2008 R2 (Service Pack 1), including Hyper-V improvements such as live migration and dynamic memory. This handbook takes a look at BranchCache, the product’s automated caching capability, the DirectAccess remote management feature, several PowerShell enhancements and the product’s ability to reduce power consumption. We'll take a close look at how to get the most from your upgrade, including insights on what are the most useful third-party tools and what hardware options are best for your server needs. If you aren’t ready to make the switch just yet, we'll discuss what you can do in the interi m, including how to test and update your 32-bit applications to ensure they'll be compatible with the 64-bit Windows Server 2008 R2 platform.

        View E-Handbook
      • Windows Server 2008 R2 migration checklist for SMBs

        Data centers that are still running Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2008 should look to migrate at least some legacy servers to Windows 2008 R2 in order to take advantage of its greatly expanded manageability options. And as organizations move existing servers to new hardware, they also need to take a close look at consolidation and virtualization as a way to free up space in the data center. This handbook highlights key considerations -- taking an inventory of server roles, ensuring application compatibility, creating a migration target plan, and selecting the correct edition of Windows -- to make your Win2008 R2 migration a success.

        View E-Handbook
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Identity management in the era of cloud and mobility

        Managing identity and access in the cloud represents a difficult challenge for IT administrators. Proper identity management contributes to a secure IT operation and is an element for a number of compliance regulations. For those and other reasons, an organization’s ability to control who accesses particular areas of an IT environment is important. Many IT organizations, however, aren’t succeeding; one Gartner report suggests almost half of businesses take the wrong approach to identity management. The cloud and the prevalence of mobile devices only adds layers of complexity to the problem. This handbook looks at tools and best practices that can help ensure an organization is properly handling identity management in the cloud. It will include discussion of tools and methods to manage authentication, how to work with cloud providers, and how Active Directory can and cannot help.

        View E-Handbook
      •  
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Evaluating hardware for Windows Server 2008 R2

        You might think selecting the right system to run Windows Server 2008 R2 would focus largely on price/performance factors. While these factors are high on the list, there are other key considerations. In this handbook, we explore hardware considerations for Windows Server 2008 R2, including processing power, memory, storage capacity and built-in networking connectivity and management hooks needed to properly run an application workload and a specific version of Windows Server. We also evaluate maintenance contracts and which one best suits your business needs, which hardware add-ons are worthy to bundle with the system and which built-in software you need to more easily deploy the hardware in production environments. We also review hardware requirements to get ready for Microsoft’s next-generation operating system.

        View E-Handbook
      •  
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Ten reasons to upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2

        It's always difficult to make a change in your server operating system, especially if your current solution mostly meets your needs. But organizations running older versions of Windows Server should take a hard look at upgrading to 2008 R2, which offers a number of new features that can serve to increase productivity and lower the total cost of ownership (TCO). In this handbook we explore the enhanced capabilities of Windows Server 2008 R2 (Service Pack 1), including Hyper-V improvements such as live migration and dynamic memory. This handbook takes a look at BranchCache, the product’s automated caching capability, the DirectAccess remote management feature, several PowerShell enhancements and the product’s ability to reduce power consumption. We'll take a close look at how to get the most from your upgrade, including insights on what are the most useful third-party tools and what hardware options are best for your server needs. If you aren’t ready to make the switch just yet, we'll discuss what you can do in the interi m, including how to test and update your 32-bit applications to ensure they'll be compatible with the 64-bit Windows Server 2008 R2 platform.

        View E-Handbook
      • Windows Server 2008 R2 migration checklist for SMBs

        Data centers that are still running Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2008 should look to migrate at least some legacy servers to Windows 2008 R2 in order to take advantage of its greatly expanded manageability options. And as organizations move existing servers to new hardware, they also need to take a close look at consolidation and virtualization as a way to free up space in the data center. This handbook highlights key considerations -- taking an inventory of server roles, ensuring application compatibility, creating a migration target plan, and selecting the correct edition of Windows -- to make your Win2008 R2 migration a success.

        View E-Handbook
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Windows Server 2012 migration station

        Windows Server has traditionally formed the cornerstone of the IT infrastructure in many organizations, and, for a majority of those companies, that will remain true. Enhancements in areas such as automation and scalability, however, make Windows Server 2012 much more of a cloud tool.

        This handbook provides details about what's changed in Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2. It also includes guidance on how best to bring Windows Server 2012's enhanced capabilities into a data center with as little disruption as possible.

        View E-Handbook
      •  
      Page 1 of 1