Creating discrete pagefile volume increases system performance

Pagefiles, or swap files, cause real problems for many systems administrators. Placed on the boot partition or data partitions, they quickly fragment, slowing performance. Creating a separate volume for the swap file can solve the problem.

Pagefiles, or swap files, cause real problems for many systems administrators. Placed on the boot partition or data partitions, they quickly fragment, slowing performance. It's tempting to use a fixed size swap file, but this can sometimes result in a sluggish server busily swapping out memory pages for no good reason.

When building a server, an administrator should leave enough empty disk space to create a separate volume for the swap file. With no other files, this can be a dynamic pagefile, shrinking and growing as needed. If crash log analysis is important, a small fixed size swap file on the boot partition can be added by the admin.

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This was first published in June 2007
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