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This PowerShell module takes control of NTFS permissions

One simple install of the File System Security PowerShell Module can help manage NTFS permissions for user access to folders.

Although PowerShell includes a set of native cmdlets for configuring storage, the ability to configure NTFS permissions...

is noticeably absent. Fortunately, Microsoft does provide a way to retrieve and configure NTFS permissions through PowerShell, but to do so you will need to download and install a dedicated module.

The required module is the File System Security PowerShell Module. Copy the files into a folder named NTFSSecurity within the PowerShell modules folder (you will have to create the NTFSSecurity folder). By default the PowerShell Modules folder is located at: %Windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules.

Once the module has been copied to the appropriate folder, it is a good idea to verify the module's availability by using the following command:

Get-Module –ListAvailable

Assuming that the NTFS module is listed, you should be able to import it by using the following command:

Import-Module NTFSSecurity

Keep in mind that unless you have changed the server's execution policy via the Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet, this command will produce an error message telling you that running scripts is disabled on the system.

Once the execution policy has been imported you will be able to work with NTFS permissions. However, you will have to import the NTFSSecurity module each time that you need to use it.

Say I have created a folder on my server called C:\Data. With that said, let's pretend that we wanted to view the Access Control List entries for this folder. To do so, we could use the following command:

Get-NTFSAccess –Path C:\Data

This command lists each account / security group that has access to the folder, the access rights, what the rights apply to, the type of rights, and the IsInherited and InheritedFrom flags (Figure 1).

Administrator: Windows PowerShell

You can view NTFS permissions through PowerShell.

Granting access to a folder is almost as easy as viewing the existing permissions. For this task you will need to use the Add-NTFSAccess cmdlet. You will also have to specify the path, the account and the access rights. To see how this works, let's grant "Everyone" full access to the C:\Data folder. To do so, we would use the following command:

Add-NTFSAccess –Path C:\Data –Account Everyone –AccessRights FullControl

Now, I have added a permission that gives Everyone full control over C:\Data and used the Get-NTFSAccess cmdlet to verify the permission (Figure 2).

Administrator: Windows PowerShell

The Everyone group has been granted access to the C:\Data folder.

Even though I was able to grant permission to Everyone, you normally have to specify an account location (Figure 2). For example some of the existing permissions use locations such as BUILTIN or NT AUTHORITY. In the real world, you usually specify a domain name in conjunction with a group name or a user name. For example, if you wanted to grant access to the Finance group within the Contoso domain then you would enter the account as Contoso\Finance.

Removing NTFS permissions can be a little bit tricky. The command that you must use is Remove-NTFSAccess. As was the case before, you must specify the path, the account name and the rights that you want to remove. For instance, if you wanted to remove the FullControl permission from Everyone for C:\Data, you could use the following command:

Remove-NTFSAccess –Path C:\Data –Account Everyone –AccessRights FullControl

The reason why this command can be tricky is because you cannot remove inherited permissions. Furthermore, the permissions that you remove must be an exact match for the permissions that are currently assigned to the account. If you specify different permissions then nothing will happen.

Because it can sometimes be tricky to match the permissions perfectly, it may be easier to pipe several commands together as a way of removing the permissions. Suppose for instance that you wanted to remove all of the permissions for Everyone from the C:\Data folder. Rather than manually specifying the permissions, you could have PowerShell read and then remove the permissions. The code required for doing so is:

Get-NTFSAccess –Path C:\Data –Account Everyone –ExcludeInherited | Remove-NTFSAccess

It is also possible to use this command recursively if you need to remove permissions from an entire folder tree (Figure 3).

Administrator: Windows PowerShell

The permissions for Everyone have been removed.

Next Steps

Get an introduction to PowerShell 5.0

How to back up and restore NTFS permissions on a specified volume

Customize your Windows PowerShell environment

This was last published in March 2015

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Have you used PowerShell to manage permissions?
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Yes, I have used PowerShell to control NTFS permissions.
It would have been easier with the NTFSSecurity module.

Here you have my code:
# This script is a part of a larger install script that setups Server Roles and Features, installs the software, configures IIS,
# creates shared folder with permissions, creates scheduled tasks and checks that service and web-site is running.
# http://blogs.technet.com/b/josebda/archive/2010/11/12/how-to-handle-ntfs-folder-permissions-security-descriptors-and-acls-in-powershell.aspx


# Create the Requests folder if it doesn't exist
If (!(Test-Path D:\Requests))
    {
    New-Item -ItemType Directory -Path 'D:\Requests'
    }


# Share the Requests folder
New-SmbShare -Name 'Request Files Folder' -Path 'D:\Requests' -FullAccess 'Everyone'


# Get the Access Control List for the Requests folder
$acl = Get-Acl -Path D:\Requests


# Block inheritance ($true) and remove existing Access Control Entries ($false)
# http://www.millercode.com/?p=16
$acl.SetAccessRuleProtection($true,$false)


# Set the owner of the Requests folder to be the local Administrators security group
$acl.SetOwner([System.Security.Principal.NTAccount] "Administrators")


# Create the ACL by adding new ACEs
# Give System Full Control rights
$rule = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.FileSystemAccessRule('SYSTEM', 'FullControl', 'ContainerInherit, ObjectInherit', 'None', 'Allow')
$acl.AddAccessRule($rule)

# Give Administrators Full Control rights
$rule = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.FileSystemAccessRule('Administrators', 'FullControl', 'ContainerInherit, ObjectInherit', 'None', 'Allow')
$acl.AddAccessRule($rule)

# Give Network Service Full Control rights
$rule = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.FileSystemAccessRule('Network Service', 'FullControl', 'ContainerInherit, ObjectInherit', 'None', 'Allow')
$acl.AddAccessRule($rule)

# Give RequestsUserGroup Modify rights
$rule = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.FileSystemAccessRule('<Domain>\RequestsUserGroup', 'Modify', 'ContainerInherit, ObjectInherit', 'None', 'Allow')
$acl.AddAccessRule($rule)


# Apply the created ACL to the Requests folder
Set-Acl D:\Requests $acl

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