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Tune your server remotely

Tune your server remotely
Mike Marney

User Mike Marney has sent in a tip that should be music to the ears of those whose admin chores stretch over a disbursed campus, and who find themselves needing to make lots of changes to remotely located servers.

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Suppose your company covers a large area such as a military installation. You are located in Building 100, 100 First Street, while the computer you need to update is located in Building 790, 77th Avenue, 5 miles away.

Here are your choices: You can drive down and touch the machine and make these simple changes, or you can connect remotely through the registry to make the changes. Here's how to do the latter on NT 4.0. The process is similar in Windows 2000.

  1. Open Regedt32
  2. Go to registry and select Connect Network Registry.
  3. Select the Computer; you should be able to use the browse list to find the machine name.
  4. Go to the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWARE MicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionNetworkCards1 (or whatever number card you need to change on that machine -- some machines may have multiple NIC's), and record the ServiceName value.
  5. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEM CurrentControlSetServices<ServiceName>Parameters TCPIP, where <ServiceName> is the name you recorded in the previous step.
  6. Change the values of EnableDHCP to 1 and IPAddress And SubnetMask to 0.0.0.0.
  7. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEM CurrentControlSetServicesDHCP and change the Start value to 2.

SMS or one of the other services could allow the use of remote control but that is another story.


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Related Book

Windows 2000 Administration in a Nutshell
Author: Mitch Tulloch
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Published: Feb 2001
Summary:
Anyone who installs Windows 2000, creates a user, or adds a printer is a 2000 system administrator. This book covers all the important day-to-day administrative tasks, and the tools for performing each task are included in a handy easy-to-look-up alphabetical reference. What's the same and what's different between the Windows 2000 and Windows NT platform? Has the GUI or the networking architecture changed, and if so, how? Windows 2000 Administration in a Nutshell addresses the problems associated with bridging the gap between the Windows NT and Windows 2000 platforms.


This was first published in August 2001

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