Andrea Danti - Fotolia

Manage Learn to apply best practices and optimize your operations.

How to fortify your virtualized Active Directory design

It takes a little work to fine-tune your Active Directory deployment, but the benefits will result in little to no service interruptions to your users if an outage occurs.

Active Directory is much more than a simple server role. It has become the single sign-on source for most, if not all, of your data center applications and services. This access control covers workstation logins and extends to clouds and cloud services.

Since AD is such a key part of many organizations, it is critical that it is always available and has the resiliency and durability to match business needs. Microsoft had enough foresight to set up AD as a distributed platform that can continue to function -- without much or, in some cases, no interruption in services -- even if parts of the system went offline. This was helpful when AD nodes were still physical servers that were often spread across multiple racks or data centers to avoid downtime. So, the question now becomes, what's the right way to virtualize Active Directory design?

Don't defeat the native AD distributed abilities

Active Directory is a distributed platform, so virtualizing it will hinder the native distributed functionality of the software. AD nodes can be placed on different hosts and fail-over software will restart VMs if a host crashes, but what if your primary storage goes down? It's one scenario you should not discount.

When you undertake the Active Directory design process for a virtualization platform, you must go beyond just a host failure and look at common infrastructure outages that can take out critical systems. One of the advantages of separate physical servers was the level of resiliency the arrangement provided. While we don't want to abandon virtual servers, we must understand the limits and concerns associated with them and consider additional areas such as management clusters.

Management clusters are often slightly lower tier platforms -- normally still virtualized -- that only contain management servers, applications and infrastructure. This is where you would want to place a few AD nodes, so they are outside of the production environment they manage. The challenge with a virtualized management cluster is that it can't be placed on the same physical storage location as production; this defeats the purpose of separation of duties. You can use more cost-effective storage platforms such as a virtual storage area network for shared storage or even local storage.

Remember, this is infrastructure and not core production, so IOPS should not be as much of an issue because the goal is resiliency, not performance. This means local drives and RAID groups should be able to provide the IOPS required.

How to keep AD running like clockwork

One of the issues with AD controllers in a virtualized environment is time drift.

All computers have clocks and proper timekeeping is critical to both the performance and security of the entire network. Most servers and workstations get their time from AD, which helps to keep everything in sync and avoids Kerberos security login errors.

These AD servers would usually get their time from a time source if they were physical or from the hosts if virtualized from them. The AD servers would then keep the time synchronized with the internal clock of the computer based on CPU cycles.

When you virtualize a server, it no longer has a set number of CPU cycles to base its time on. That means time can drift until it reaches out for an external time check to reset itself. But that time check can also be off since you might be unable to tell the passage of time until the next check, which compounds the issue. Time drift can become stuck in a nasty loop because the virtualization hosts often get their time from Active Directory.

Your environment needs an external time source that is not dependent on virtualization to keep things grounded. While internet time sources are tempting, having the infrastructure reach out for time checks might not be ideal. A core switch or other key piece of networking gear can offer a dependable time source that is unlikely to be affected by drift due to its hardware nature. You can then use this time source as the sync source for both the virtualization hosts and AD, so all systems are on the same time that comes from the same source.

Some people will insist on a single physical server in a virtualized data center for this reason. That's an option, but one that is not usually needed. Virtualization isn't something to avoid in Active Directory design, but it needs to be done with thought and planning to ensure the infrastructure can support the AD configuration. Management clusters are key to the separation of AD nodes and roles.

This does not mean that high availability (HA) rules for Hyper-V or VMware environments are not required. Both production and management environments should have HA rules to prevent AD servers from running on the same hosts.

Rules should be in place to ensure these servers restart first and have reserved resources for proper operations. Smart HA rules are easy to overlook as more AD controllers are added and the rules configuration is forgotten.

The goal is not to prevent outages from happening -- that's not possible. It is to have enough replicas and roles of AD in the right places so users won't notice. You might scramble a little behind the scenes if a disruption happens, but that's part of the job. The key is to keep customers moving along without them knowing about any of the issues happening in the background.

Dig Deeper on Microsoft identity and access management

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchServerVirtualization

SearchCloudComputing

SearchSQLServer

SearchEnterpriseDesktop

SearchVirtualDesktop

Close